CNC Machinist Job Description

CNC Machinist Job Description, Skills, and Salary

Are you searching for a CNC machinist job description? Get to know about the duties, responsibilities, qualifications, and skills requirements of a CNC machinist. Feel free to use our CNC machinist job description template to produce your own CNC machinist job description. We also provide you with information about the salary you can earn as a CNC machinist.

 

Who is a CNC Machinist?

A CNC machinist is a person who uses CNC machinery to make tools and parts out of materials including plastic, metal, and other materials. Others operate with several different machines, while some prefer to specialize in a particular category of equipment, such as milling machines.

The daily responsibilities of CNC machinists may vary depending on the industry. Typically, they make that their equipment is configured properly, is operating as it should, and is creating parts that adhere to the necessary standards.

 

Things to consider when choosing a Career in CNC Machining

  1. Passion for Working with Computers: A career in CNC machinery is a wonderful fit for someone who enjoys the challenge of fixing computers when things go wrong. Additionally, if you’re fascinated by computer technology, a career as a CNC machinist can be appealing to you.

Lathes, mills, and shape raw materials like metals and plastics are combined with digital and physical tools to create CNC machines. Computers are used to control and precisely direct these instruments. In reality, every stage of the CNC machining process involves computers. Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) drawings are created from the concepts developed by engineers. The speed, movement, and other parameters that each tool follows are controlled by G-code, which is subsequently translated from these 3D digital representations.

A CNC machinist must comprehend each process and be able to troubleshoot any issues that may arise. Any CNC machinist must possess computer literacy and the will to learn more about them.

  1. Keen Attention to Details: Lathes, mills, and shape raw materials like metals and plastics are combined with digital and physical tools to create CNC machines. Computers are used to control and precisely direct these instruments. In reality, every stage of the CNC machining process involves computers. Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) drawings are created from the concepts developed by engineers. The speed, movement, and other parameters that each tool follows are controlled by G-code, which is subsequently translated from these 3D digital representations.

A CNC machinist must comprehend each process and be able to troubleshoot any issues that may arise. Any CNC machinist must possess computer literacy and the will to learn more about them.

  1. Passion for Creating Things: When a block of metal is transformed into a part that is manufactured to exacting standards, there is a certain satisfaction that results. Where there was once only a lump of metal, there is now something real and useful. The concepts that engineers and CNC machine operators introduce to the world are contained within those blocks of raw materials.

A CNC machinist is crucial to the production process. Starting with a concept, you take the essential actions to make it a tangible reality. It’s like having the skills of an alchemist, artist, and programmer all at once. A career as a CNC machinist can be a good fit for you if you enjoy the process of producing new things.

  1. Good Time Management Skills: The process of CNC machining involves several phases, and there are many ways to improve its efficiency. Knowing how long each step might take, how long it takes for raw materials to load, and how long it takes for various tools to set up are all crucial when estimating how long a job will take. A lucrative job as a CNC machinist may be yours if you’re organized and enjoy learning how to improve efficiency by changing the way things are done.
  2. Outstanding Problem-Solving Abilities: Computers have inherent limitations, even if CNC machining is an automated operation. There will always be difficulties that need to be resolved or adjustments that need to be made. It can involve setting up a new tool or determining why a job that has previously run without error is now experiencing issues. It’s crucial to have an analytical mindset and the capacity to view a situation from various perspectives.
  3. Adaptation Skills: You’ll encounter difficulties in your work as a CNC machinist. A machine may not have been set up properly by the person who came before you, it may be jammed, or the tools may be worn out from numerous manufacturing runs. Inevitably, things won’t always go as expected. Furthermore, it’s critical to have the flexibility to adjust to any situation that arises.
  4. Ability to Work in a Team: If you enter a machine shop believing you are an expert, you probably won’t get very far and won’t make many friends because machine shops are about teamwork. However, working as a CNC machinist allows you to interact and advance with others in the same profession if you enjoy exchanging ideas and learning from others who have more expertise.
  5. Possession of a Good Work Ethic: If you enter a machine shop believing you are an expert, you probably won’t get very far and won’t make many friends because machine shops are about teamwork. However, working as a CNC machinist allows you to interact and advance with others in the same profession if you enjoy exchanging ideas and learning from others who have more expertise.

 

CNC Machinist Job Description

What is a CNC machinist job description? A CNC machinist job description is simply a list of duties and responsibilities of a CNC machinist in an organization. Below are the CNC machinist job description examples you can use to develop your resume or write a CNC machinist job description for your employee. Employers can also use it to sieve out job seekers when choosing candidates for interviews.

The duties and responsibilities of a CNC machinist include the following:

  • Build tools and items to create and understand instructions and methods efficiently.
  • Accept data from all sources that are relevant.
  • Control equipment and procedures.
  • Conduct inspections of the machinery, buildings, supplies, and goods.
  • Analyze data to determine the best answers to problems.
  • Complete the change-over tasks (preparing the machine for the new job setup from the previous job setup) and finish manufacturing the first item following the process instructions.
  • Check the dimensions, amount, flaws, required heat lot, and certification numbers of the raw materials that were given.
  • Utilize an ERP system to record the number of goods produced.
  • Inspect and record the items according to the requirements of the in-process inspection sheet.
  • Collaborate with the engineering division to enhance machining procedures.
  • Stabilize the machining operations before handing the production run over to the operator.
  • Approve a work order using the ERP system.
  • Follow all safety instructions and keep the workspace and equipment tidy and organized.
  • Collaborate with the engineering and CAM programming departments to create and enhance CNC programs.
  • Understand the Quality Management System to maintain quality standards.

 

Qualifications

  1. College course: You must complete a post-secondary education to get the practical engineering abilities necessary to become a CNC machinist. A Level 1 Certificate in performing engineering operations or a Level 2 Certificate in mechanical engineering are just a couple of the certificate programs you can enroll in. You need two GCSEs in grades 3 to 1 for Level 1 courses and two GCSEs in grades 9 to 3 for Level 2 programs.
  2. Apprenticeship: You can look into apprenticeship programs to work in engineering. The advanced apprenticeship for CNC technicians is one of the programs offered.
  3. Experience:   CAD/CAM software proficiency is required, as is the ability to set up, program, and run CNC lathes and mills to create parts. Aptitude for describing the machinability of materials, handling tools, presenting tool cutters, and choosing suitable coolants for CNC manufacturing.

 

Essential Skills

  1. Software skills: When you get employed, you don’t have to be an expert with software, but you do need to know how to utilize a few certain tools. You will be required to carry out elementary tasks and do mathematical computations as an entry-level employee. As you advance in your career, your company will anticipate that you will gain greater knowledge of the program.
  2. Physical Agility: You must be able to stand still for extended periods and be physically active to operate as a CNC machinist. While part of your job entails watching the machine run, you also need to gather the supplies, clean the output from the machine, package the pieces, and perform other manual duties. Although the majority of these jobs are simple, physical fitness is required.
  3. Orientation to Details: CNC machinists require a keen sense of detail and a tendency toward perfection. The machine’s settings must be accurate in every way. In a similar vein, you must clean and package the goods precisely following the requirements of your firm.
  4. Ability to Multi-task: As a CNC machinist, you balance a variety of responsibilities, from loading stock materials to overseeing the production process and testing finished goods. To succeed in the position, you require multitasking abilities.
  5. A Passion for Expertise: A drive to become an expert in the positions is required to succeed, just like in any other technical position. The highly sophisticated trade of CNC machining necessitates both technical expertise and engineering knowledge. As technology advances swiftly, good operators must be prepared to continually learn and upgrade their skills.

 

How to Become a CNC Machinist

  1. Investigate the career duties of a CNC machinist: There are several machinist positions available. Knowing the precise professional route you want to take is crucial if you want to start a career as a CNC machinist. There are typically three categories of CNC machine operators:
    • Operating machinists
    • Set-up machinists
    • Programming machinists

An operation machinist’s responsibilities include making ensuring that machines run as efficiently as possible. Set-up machinists are in charge of keeping an eye on the machinery, making changes, and carrying out other duties to guarantee flawless operations. Machinists who code CNC programs and modify existing programs are experts in ensuring that components are produced smoothly and to the required standards. Making the best choice for the course combination to pursue will depend on the type of employment that most interests you.

  1. Enroll in Preparatory Courses: The majority of firms demand that CNC machinists have a high school diploma or equivalent. It is advised to enroll in a postsecondary CNC machining program after high school. This program includes both formal classroom instruction and hands-on training. You can enroll in classes in blueprint reading, technical drafting, machine tooling, and metalworking to get ready for the CNC training program. Additional algebra and trigonometry instruction will also help you stand out from the competition in a congested job market.
  2. Get a Degree: Although a degree is not a requirement for employment as a CNC machinist, firms prefer to select candidates with degrees. If you choose a certificate program, learning fundamental abilities like measurement, inspection, and blueprint reading only takes a few months. Technical colleges provide entire CNC machinist degree programs, which normally take two academic years to complete. To prepare students for the employment market, these programs include both general education courses and courses tailored to the business.
  3. Finish a Formal Apprenticeship: It requires time and intensive on-the-job training to become a skilled machinist. Formal apprenticeships are one approach to getting practical experience. Depending on your training and interests, an apprenticeship is an entry-level program that lasts up to four years. Through hands-on practice using real equipment, apprenticeships assist students in translating their classroom knowledge into a practical setting. Following are some lessons picked up during an apprenticeship program:
    • Safety practices
    • The basics of CNC machine operation
    • Metallurgy
    • Computer-aided design
    • CNC programming

It’s vital to remember that firms looking to hire CNC machinists will be very interested in a candidate’s work history. Therefore, having completed an apprenticeship could benefit you when looking for work.

  1. Obtain certification: Whether or not you have a degree, completing an apprenticeship successfully qualifies you for certification as a credentialed worker. You can tell if you’re certified if you have the necessary skill set to run CNC equipment. The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) offers certification for CNC machinists. To qualify, candidates must pass a performance-based written and practical exam. There are three levels of certification available:
    • CNC set-up programmer
    • Certified journey worker
    • NIMS certified machinist

Although certification is not a prerequisite, getting a NIMS endorsement has several benefits:

    • It makes you more employable.
    • It improves your professional image.
    • It presents chances for networking.
    • It could be crucial for advancing your job.
    • It demonstrates that you keep learning new things.
  1. Put your skills to use: The next step after earning your certification as a CNC machinist is to locate a position where you can put your abilities to use. To do this, look for employment in the manufacturing industry. Potential employers for CNC machine operators include:

As an alternative, some CNC machinists decide to work for themselves as consultants. Depending on your financial capabilities, you can also choose to buy a machine to carry out little industrial chores for pay.

 

Where to Work as a CNC Machinist

  • Aerospace industry
  • Automotive industry
  • Shipbuilding
  • Power generation companies
  • Engineering maintenance
  • Rail transport
  • Defense
  • Medical
  • Oil and gas
  • Marine
  • Metalworking Machinery Manufacturing

 

CNC Machinist Salary Scale

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that demand for CNC machinists will increase by 3% yearly at least through 2029, which is about average for all occupations. The majority of these positions will become available as a result of the need to replace personnel who depart the industry due to retirement or attrition. Additionally, as technology advances, there will likely be an increase in demand for CNC machinists who are proficient in using the specialized production machinery.

According to the BLS, as of 2019, CNC machinists made an average of $44,420 per year or $21.99 per hour. Depending on the state, the size of the company, the industry, and the level of expertise of the job candidate, these numbers may change. It is normal for experienced machinists to make more money than those who are just starting. According to some estimates, CNC machinists make $64,981 annually, or $31.30 an hour.

The pay range for CNC machine operators, according to National Careers, is between £20,000 and £35,000 annually. Since you have little experience, your pay is reduced when you are a trainee in the position. Your remuneration will change in line with how much experience and transferable abilities you gain. Working more hours or accepting more responsibility are two ways to improve your earning chances.

Job Description

Leave a Reply